Connor Boyack on Nullification

Connor has posted a great article on the concept of nullification which also deals with the loss of states rights under the 17th amendment. I encourage you to read it here:

http://www.connorboyack.com/blog/nullification-a-necessary-power-for-state-sovereignty

Here is his article’s introduction:

“There has been plenty of chatter in the past year about “state’s rights” (more correctly termed “state’s powers”, as political entities do not themselves have any rights) and the tenth amendment to the Constitution which provides that any power not expressly delegated to the federal government is reserved to the states, or to the people. Concerned citizens of all political persuasions have rallied around the banner of federalism to promote abolishing or restricting federal programs and replacing them with state-based alternatives, or nothing at all.

For all the noise being made by the cacophony of individuals frustrated with the federal government, however, few either understand or are willing to embrace the two key components that would make their goals a reality, rather than a slogan painted on a banner for a tea party protest. In order to demand—not ask—that the federal government limit itself to its constitutionally delegated authority and nothing more, states themselves must have representation in the federal government, and they must nullify any federal law that is clearly outside of the scope of federal jurisdiction.”

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He also posted this very different video on Thomas Woods being interviewed by a Zombie about his new book Nullification… It’s pretty funny, especially the end.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrcM5exDxcc[/youtube]

2 Responses to “Connor Boyack on Nullification”

  • lewisbarnavelt:

    Oak, I hear a lot of noise about repealing the 17th amendment, but would you be so kind to give a no-spin history for the reasons the 17th amendment was passed in the first place?

  • lewisbarnavelt:

    Oak, I hear a lot of noise about repealing the 17th amendment, but would you be so kind to give a no-spin history for the reasons the 17th amendment was passed in the first place?