BYU Ed Department’s Jungian Scholar

Fourth in our series this week exposing BYU’s Education Department connections, today we look at the philosophy embraced by professors and how they are reaching our local school districts with their agenda. This isn’t an indication it’s in every classroom or even most of them. It’s just part of putting people with your philosophy into positions of power, much like President Obama’s cabinet and Czars who are drastically affecting our lives.

The following letter is one I received from someone who wishes to remain anonymous. I interject below.

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First, I’d like to give you some background about what I’m uncovering in Canyons District just in case it comes in handy on anything you’re doing.

Alta High’s new principal, Fidel Montero, was hired after the “racist incident” at Alta. He was Timpview’s Asst. Principal. Fox 13 News reported on May 18th, 2011 the following:

The Canyon School District says it chose Montero because of his impressive resume. Before his work as a teacher, Montero consulted inner-city schools in Miami and and Los Angeles.

“He is an expert in multicultural education. He is expert in school reform,” says Jennifer Tumor-Cook, spokesperson for the Canyon School District. “

Oak note: please see Monday and Tuesday’s articles for information on multiculturalism problems at BYU’s Education Department.

Canyon’s School Board was also given social-justice educator, Linda-Darling Hammond’s, book “Flat World in Education and How America’s Commitment to Equity will Determine our Future” by our Deputy Superintendent, Ginger Rhodes. Upon reading it, a member of the board, Paul McCarty said, “I see a lot of it as a blueprint for where we are heading in Canyons District.”

Oak note: Linda-Darling Hammond was recommended by Bill Ayers to President Obama to be his Secretary of Education.

After this, Canyon’s District invited the Southern Poverty Law Center to come teach their social-justice program “Teaching Tolerance” to leaders, teachers and student-leaders in the entire district. This infuriated me!

After these tidbits, I looked up Fidel Montero and discovered that he’d come out of the David O. McKay School. And, because I knew what you’d uncovered about their connections to the NNER, I did some research.

The book Fidel co-wrote, Understanding the Whole Student: Holistic Multicultural Education , was co-written with Clifford Mayes, Ramona Cutri, & Clint Rogers (all from the David O. McKay School).

You already know a little about Ramona Cutri, but last night I finally got around to looking into Clifford Mayes. If you don’t already know, his bio describes him as a jungian scholar. This fact will be important as you read further. Here’s the link to his info on wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford_Mayes

Oak note: from his BYU Vita we find these interests and papers mentioning multiculturalism and Jungian thought.

September 1996-present: Brigham Young University.
Position: Associate Professor of Education (received tenure: 2003; advancement to full professor anticipated in AY 2007)
Duties: Teaching graduate courses in social history of U.S. education, curriculum history and theory, multiculturalism, instructional theory.
Interests: Curriculum theory and history, multiculturalism, (neo-)Freudian/(neo-)Jungian theory and practice in pedagogics.

Mayes, C. (2003). Foundations of an archetypal pedagogy. Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought. C.G. Institute of Los Angeles, 46, 104-116.

Mayes, C. (2005). Ten pillars of a Jungian approach to education. Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice, 18(2), “30-40.

Mayes, C., and Blackwell Mayes, P. (2005) Jung, Mormonism, and the dialectics of exaltation. Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought. C.G. Institute of Los Angeles, 48, 84-107

After reading about his background, and how he developed a new way of teaching called archetypal pedagogy, I decided to look up how Critical Pedagogy related it. Critical Pedagogy is described on wikipedia as this:

“Based in Marxist theory, critical pedagogy draws on radical democracy, anarchism, feminism, and other movements that strive for what they describe as social justice.”

Because I’ve now become a skeptic, I started wondering, “Could Clifford Mayes just be using this new term, archetypal pedagogy, to hide the fact that he’s actually teaching critical pedagogy?” So, I looked up jungian pedagogy with critical pedagogy and hit the very sad-jackpot on this BYU Jungian Scholar…

Critical Pedagogy and Cognition: An Introduction to a Postformal Educational —By Curry Stephenson Malott

“A Jungian Pedagogy therefore rejects not only traditional approaches to education that assume that teachers save kids from their inferior cultures by implementing the policies of the superior ruling class, but also the assumption that the only thing that needs to happen for revolutionary change to occur is for dominant institutions to be replaced by ones led by the organic leaders of the oppressed classes. In practice, traditional revolutions follow a hierarchical structure where movement leaders develop vision, agenda, and tactics and an army of activist-pawns carry them out.

A Jungian revolution, on the other hand, would be much more complex involving all members of society engaged in serious, rigorous self-reflection, and theoretical and historical investigations. The new society would emerge out of a rejection of the hegemony collective unconscious and therefore as a byproduct of a mass critical self-awareness that makes decisions not based on externally imposed values, but by those emanating from the internal structure of full consensus.”

So, as you can see, it really is a psychological-warfare marketing campaign for the masses, and far too many Americans are falling for it.

Oak note: Jungian pedagogy is exactly what Bill Ayers has been preaching for decades and is essentially the overthrow of our current government to be replaced by the oppressed “workers of the world uniting.” See these posts for more information on Bill Ayers if you don’t really know his philosophy.

https://www.utahsrepublic.org/bill-ayers-exposed/ (Bill the revolutionary radical Marxist)

https://www.utahsrepublic.org/whats-the-difference-between-john-goodlad-and-bill-ayers/ (a number of quotes from Ayers related to education)

Here’s the link to Curry Stephenson’s book

Here’s a link to one (out of several) books on jungian psychology that Clifford Mayes has written:

Jung and Education: Elements of an Archetypal Pedagogy by Clifford Mayes (May 25, 2005)

Also, go to this David O. McKay School link and read about his publications, a few of which mention Social Justice outright:

http://education.byu.edu/edlf/publications.html

Oak notes: It is foolishness to assume philosophies from teachers such as these don’t get passed on to students. Everything we are colors everything we do. Multiculturalism from organizations like NAME and the NNER filters to down to students through the teachers who are scholars for these organizations. Those students in turn graduate into positions of authority as administrators and teachers.

Aside from direct classroom instruction/indoctrination, one way this happens at BYU is that CITES (Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling) trains teachers and administrators for placement within the Public School Partnership school districts. CITES is run by Steve Baugh, a John Goodlad “Agenda for Education in a Democracy” (AED) scholar. Four out of thirty national AED scholars are in Utah county, two at BYU, two in Alpine School District’s leadership.

I have had several emails asking what can be done. Get your local school board loaded with people that understand the problem and will sever the ties to the Public School Partnership at BYU and when the demand dries up, the supply will too. Your school district is paying a lot of money to CITES and to get teachers trained there. Find alternate sources of teacher training. Stop with the extreme pedagogy training and focus on content. Teachers who know their content are generally far superior teachers of subject matter. Most of all, trust no one. You are responsible for your child’s education. Be aware of the things happening at your school and your children’s classrooms. Times aren’t going to get better. Common Core State Standards will see to that.

 

3 Responses to “BYU Ed Department’s Jungian Scholar”

  • Marjohna:

    I studied and rejected all of these ideas when I was in school.  In fact when I was assigned to write a paper about these major psychologists I approached the subject from the perspective of rejection on the grounds of their total antithesis in relation to true eternal principles.  My teacher chastised me, but I had learned to work the system of general hoop-jumping well enough to meet my goals of passing the class, while still maintaining intellectual integrity, graduating and moving on to a credentialed position in the world where I might be able to combat such ideas and their destructive effect upon children.  I felt sure that a gospel-trained community would also immediately reject such ideas and methods once they were revealed as well as the system of which they are the heart.  Another instructor that was engaged in training teachers in how to use behaviorist theory to manipulate the children in their classrooms rather than respect them as free, intelligent agents, was one day demonstrating some way to use sign language and signed “You drive me crazy” at me, thinking that I did not pick up on what he was saying.  I signed back “You were there a long time ago.”  but he didn’t pick up on it.  I guess the long and short of the story is that those who embraced those ideas have the positions of honor and prosperity in the community, and I do not make a living in my field.  

  • Thejeffreyfamily:

    I have homeschooled my kids and then put them back in school 2 different times.  When I homeschooled them I tried to teach them about and read books with them about social manipulation (Goose Girl, Princess Academy, The Giver, etc.).   As a parent that is very concerned about the educational/social manipulations that happen in some schools this information frigthens me but I have to remind myself and my children that we have prepared ourselves for this and hopefully my children will remember the things that I taught them so that they can identify the wrong information and talk with me about it.  I guess it’s the same feeling we get when a huge earthquake hits and we hope that we’ve prepared our emergency supplies well enough! 

  • Sleepingheidi:

    The social manipulation in The Giver is evident. What did I miss in Goose Girl and Princess Academy? Not usually a reader of much fiction, I rather enjoyed Goose Girl.